By Daniel Carr of Moon Light Mint
Printable Catalog with Mintage Statistics for Items Designed and Minted by Daniel Carr / Moonlight Mint.

http://www.moonlightmint.com/artifacts.htm

“1909-o” Morgan Dollars – Production Blog
(Production listed in chronological order - newest production at top, oldest production at bottom)
All are over-struck on genuine US Mint Morgan Silver Dollars (circa 1878-1921), unless otherwise noted.
A few of each type were broad-struck or multi-struck with significant coin shift between over-strikes.
No genuine Morgan Silver Dollars were minted during 1905-1920. But imagine if the New Orleans Mint had decided to make silver dollars one last time upon the closing of that mint in 1909. This is what they would have looked like. All of these over-strikes have the micro-o reverse, with the same mint mark style, size, and orientation as that found on the scarce 1899-o micro-o Morgan Dollars, as well as the 1896-o, 1900-o, and 1902-o micro-o vintage counterfeits from the same time period. These vintage counterfeits were thought to be rare genuine US Mint products for a long time. It wasn’t until 2005 that someone finally realized that some intrepid counterfeiters had taken a scarce (genuine) 1899-o micro-o Morgan Silver Dollar and used it as a model to produce fake coins dated 1896, 1900, and 1902. They likely produced the fakes prior to 1940. They were well-made and contained the full amount of silver, but the strikes were soft and the high-point details were lacking. Once circulated, they were quite convincing. At the time, the scrap silver content would have been about 35 cents. With a one dollar face value, the counterfeiters could still profit by making and spending them. Even though they are counterfeits, the 1896-o, 1900-o, and 1902-o micro-o coins command strong prices from collectors today.
These 1909-o over-strikes are not counterfeits, but rather, altered genuine coins. They have sharper details than the 1896-o, 1900-o, and 1902-o vintage counterfeits.
Current Status:
All production has ended. The dies have been totally defaced and scrapped.
Tooling
Quantity

Over-Struck
Issue Price
Notes

Die Pair 2

Proof-Like

Finish
101
(final)
high-grade:
57
bag-handled:
44
$175
(high-grade)
(sold out)
$80
(bag-handled)
(sold out)
First produced January, 2012.

Micro-o reverse. Normal rims with wider gaps between obverse denticles. Open 9s in date. All show evidence of the underlying host coin design. This is manifested as doubled facial profile lines, and doubled wings. The amount of “cameo” contrast varies, with the first and last strikes having the most.
Die Pair 2

proof-like finish
external image image001.jpg
external image image002.jpg

Die Pair 2

Uncirculated

Finish
253
(final)
high-grade:
174
bag-handled:
79
$125
(high-grade)
(sold out)
$80
(bag-handled)
(sold out)
First produced October, 2011.

Micro-o reverse. Normal rims with wider gaps between obverse denticles. Open 9s in date. All show evidence of the underlying host coin design. This is manifested as doubled facial profile lines, and doubled wings. Surface texture ranges from somewhat shiny to nearly matte, depending on die state.
Die Pair 2

high-luster finish
external image image003.jpg
Die Pair 2

date details
open 9s,
normal gaps
between denticles
external image image004.jpg
Die Pair 2

mint mark details
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Die Pair 1

Proof-like

Finish
99
(final)
high-grade:
89
bag-handled:
10
$175
(high-grade)
(sold out)
$85
(bag-handled)
(sold out)
Produced October, 2011
Die Pair 1

proof-like finish
external image image006.jpg

Die Pair 1

Uncirculated

Finish
129
(final)
high-grade:
99
bag-handled: 30
$125
(high-grade)
(sold out)
$80
(bag-handled)
(sold out)
Produced October, 2011.

Micro-o reverse. Broad flat rims. All have a small shallow die defect below the “tr” of “trust”. Closed 9s in date. All show evidence of the underlying host coin design. This is manifested as doubled facial profile lines, doubled wings, and erratic denticles.
One (not released) was over-struck in error with the reverse die rotated 180 degrees from normal.
Die Pair 1

high-luster finish
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Die Pair 1

bag-handled finish
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Die Pair 1

date details
closed 9s,
narrow gaps
between denticles
external image image009.jpg
Die Pair 1

die defect below “tr”
external image image010.jpg
Die Pair 1

mint mark details
external image image011.jpg

“1964-D” & “1965-D” Fantasy Over-Struck Peace Dollars – Production Blog
(Production listed in chronological order - newest production at top, oldest production at bottom)
All are over-struck on genuine (circa 1922-1935) US Mint Peace Silver Dollars, unless otherwise noted.
A few of each type were broad-struck or multi-struck with significant coin shift between over-strikes.
The 1964-D Peace silver dollar is one of the most enigmatic coins in history. On August 3 1964 legislation was enacted authorizing 45 million new silver dollars to be coined. In May 1965 the White House finally ordered some to be produced and the Denver Mint soon minted 316,076 of the coins which carried a 1964 date and a design identical to the Peace silver dollar last minted from 1921-1935. Shortly after the first mintage, an order went out to destroy them. The Treasury Department claims every one was accounted for and melted. None have publicly surfaced in the 45 years since. If an original 1964 Peace silver dollar were to turn up, it would be subject to immediate confiscation since it would be assumed to be stolen government property.
2014 is the 50th anniversary of the original 1964 Peace Silver Dollars (which were actually struck in calendar year 1965). The “1965-D” over-strikes serve as a 50th anniversary commemorative coin.
This modern over-strike "1964-D" Peace silver dollar is the most exacting and faithful rendition ever produced. Holding this coin in hand gives the viewer a true sense of what it would be like to own an original 1964-D Peace silver dollar. And since these were over-struck on genuine Peace silver dollars, they have the correct weight (no metal is added or removed), correct metallic content, and correct diameter. Even the number of reeds on the edge (189) is correct. And to top it off, all the over-strikes were privately and painstakingly performed using a surplus Denver Mint coin press.


In an ironic twist, the original 1964 Peace dollars are illegal to own. But this modern fantasy is LEGAL and is not required to carry a "COPY" stamp for the following reasons:


1) These are not copies of Peace silver dollars - they are privately over-struck on GENUINE government-issue Peace silver dollars that were originally minted from 1922-1935.

2) According to the US Treasury, no 1964 Peace silver dollars survived (and none were ever minted with a “1965” date) - so these over-strikes can't be a copy of since the originals don't exist.

3) Defacing of US coins is legal so long as the defacement isn't for fraudulent purposes.

Current Status:
All production has ended.

All “1964” and “1965” dies have been totally defaced and scrapped.
Total production of “1964” over-strikes (all types & issues combined, prior to die cancellation): 1,964.

50 additional pieces were broad-struck using the cancelled dies on various items.

Items that were destroyed after striking are not included in the mintage totals.
Total production of “1965” over-strikes (all types & issues combined): 523.


Tooling
Quantity

Over-Struck
Issue Price
Notes





Die Pair 7

”1965”
523
(final)
high-grade:

376
bag-handled: 147
$125

(sold out)
(high-grade)

$80
(bag-handled)
First produced April, 2014.

Two (not released) were over-struck on Kennedy Half Dollars (one 1964 90% silver, one 1965 40% silver). Four (not released) were over-struck on copper-nickel clad Eisenhower dollars 1971-D and 1977-D. Two of those were broad-struck.
Die Pair 7

”1965”
external image image001.jpg


Die Pair 6

”1964”

Cancelled Die Strikes
50
(final)
N/A
Produced January, 2011.

All show prominent “X” on obverse and reverse, retained die break at date, and clashed dies on reverse. Various test strikes (for personal entertainment purposes) as follows:
(7) Broad-struck on 39mm copper blank.

(3) Broad-struck on 39mm nickel-alloy blank.

(2) Broad-struck on 39mm 999 silver blank (1 troy oz.).

(3) Broad-struck on 39mm 2006 ANA Denver Coin Club antiqued bronze medal.

(1) Broad-struck on 36mm steel washer.
(1) Broad-struck on 1965 copper-nickel clad Washington Quarter.
(1) Broad-struck on 1964-D Jefferson Nickel.
(1) Broad-struck on 1971 copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1971-D copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(2) Broad-struck on 1971-S silver clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1972 copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1972-D copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1974 copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(14) Broad-struck on 1974-D copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(2) Broad-struck on 1974-S copper-nickel clad proof Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1974-S silver clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1976 copper-nickel clad Bicentennial (type-2) Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1976-D copper-nickel clad Bicentennial (type-1) Eisenhower Dollar.
(2) Broad-struck on 1976-D copper-nickel clad Bicentennial (type-2) Eisenhower Dollar. *
(1) Broad-struck on 1977 copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1977-D copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.
(1) Broad-struck on 1978 copper-nickel clad Eisenhower Dollar.

(1) Broad-struck over previously over-struck “1964-D” Peace Silver Dollar.
* One was sold on eBay in June 2011. Final sale price: $480.55
Die 5 Reverse, Die 6 Reverse,

Die Pair 5 & 6 Obverse.

Major die failure at date.

These three dies produced

all released “1964” over-strikes.

After producing some
cancelled-die strikes,

the dies were totally

defaced and scrapped.
external image image002.jpg
Die Pair 6

cancelled die broad-strike over

1974-D copper-nickel clad

Eisenhower Dollar
external image image003.jpg

Die Pair 6

Un-cancelled

Test Strikes
14
(final)
N/A
Produced January, 2011.
All show a major retained die break (obverse, in the date area).

Various test strikes (for personal entertainment purposes) as follows:
(1) Broad-struck on sandblasted 39mm pure iron blank.

(1) Broad-struck on 39mm nickel-alloy blank.

(1) Broad-struck on 39mm brass blank.

(1) Broad-struck on 39mm 999 silver blank (1 troy oz.).

(1) Broad-struck on sandblasted 39mm 1971 US Postal Service brass token.

(1) Broad-struck on 39mm 2006 ANA Denver Coin Club antiqued bronze medal.

(1) Broad-struck on 34mm US Denver Mint President Lincoln bronze medal.

Pieces below show clashed dies on reverse.

(2) Over-struck on 1922-1935 Peace Silver Dollar.

(3) Broad-struck over 1922-1935 Peace Silver Dollar, retained cud die break at date.

(1) Multi-broad-struck over 39mm nickel-alloy blank, retained cud die break at date.

(1) Broad-struck over 39mm copper blank, retained cud die break at date.
Die Pair 6

broken-die broad-strike over

normal broad-strike on

39mm nickel blank
(clashed dies reverse)
external image image004.jpg

Die Pair 6

Gold-Plated
10
(final)
N/A
Produced January, 2011.

Test strikes (the Peace Dollars were gold-plated prior to over-striking).
Die Pair 6

gold plated finish
external image image005.jpg

Die Pair 6

Matte Proof

Finish
152
(final)
$190
(sold out)
Produced January, 2011.

These coins were bead-blasted and burnished after over-striking to produce matte proofs.

Certificates issued with these coins identify them as “Die Pair 6, Sandblast Matte”.
Die Pair 6

matte proof finish
external image image006.jpg

Die Pair 6

Proof-like

Finish
180
(final)
$175
(sold out)
Produced December, 2010.

The reverse die lost some frosting and polish during the first few strikes, and as a result some coins show less cameo contrast on the reverse than the obverse.
Die Pair 6

proof-like finish
external image image007.jpg

Die Pair 6

Uncirculated

Finish
542
(final)
high-grade:

379
bag-handled: 163
$150
(sold out)
Produced October, 2010.

Obverse die carried over from Die Pair 5. New reverse die shows a die gouge to the right of “D” mint mark. Obverse continues high-luster stain finish. Reverse is an earlier die state and the appearance ranges from somewhat matte to shiny. The reverse die was periodically sandblasted during production runs. Rims on both sides are broader and somewhat flatter than previous over-strikes. Five coins had the rims rolled as a test prior to striking. The difference in appearance is minimal. Bag-handled coins were issued with certificates stating “Die Pair 6, Bulk-Handling Finish”. High-grade coins were issued with certificates stating “Die Pair 6, High-Grade Finish”.
Die Pair 6

uncirculated finish
external image image008.jpgexternal image image009.jpg
Die Pair 6

die gouge right of mint mark
external image image010.jpg


Die Pair 5

Normal Reeding

Single-Struck
7
(final)
high-luster: 5
bag-handled: 2
N/A
Produced October 2010.
This and all subsequent over-strikes use a collar with a reeding depth of 0.003 inches. Previous damage to reverse die required that it be ground down to fit in collar – resulting in very thin reverse rims.
Die Pair 5
warped & expanded reverse
flat obverse rims
very narrow reverse rims
external image image011.jpgexternal image image012.jpg
Die Pair 5
normal edge reeding
external image image013.jpg

Die Pair 5

Shallow Reeds

Single-Struck
7
(final)
high-luster: 5
bag-handled: 2
N/A
Produced October 2010.
Over-struck using a ground-down collar yielding very shallow smoothed edge reeding. All previous issues used a collar with a reeding depth of 0.006 inches. The reeding on the collar was ground down in an attempt to reduce the “saw-tooth” rim appearance, but the grinding went too far and eradicated much of the reeding. After seven were produced, two Peace Dollars were inadvertently inserted into the coining chamber together and then over-struck, causing a catastrophic brockage resulting in a collar failure, and a buckling of the reverse die. The brockage coins were subsequently melted.
Die Pair 5

shallow smoothed edge reeding
external image image014.jpg
Die Pair 5
broken collar and brockage pair
external image image015.jpgexternal image image016.jpg

Die Pair 5

Deep Reeding

Single-Struck
789
(final)
high-luster:

589
bag-handled:

200
$125
(sold out)
Produced October 2010.
Over-struck once at 300 tons. Strong “cartwheel” luster. About 200 were bag-handled and were issued with certificates stating “Die Pair 5, Bulk-Handling Finish”. The remainder are high-grade individually-handled and were issued with certificates stating “Die Pair 5, High-Luster Finish”. One (not released) was test-struck on a copper-nickel clad US Mint Eisenhower Dollar blank. Another (not released) was a flip-over double over-strike that was subsequently over-struck by “1964-D” Franklin Half Dollar dies.
Die Pair 5

single-strike high-luster
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Die Pair 5

single-strike bag-handled
external image image019.jpgexternal image image020.jpg
Die Pair 5

double-struck “pocket peace”
external image image021.jpgexternal image image022.jpg

Die Pair 5

Deep Reeding

Quad-Struck
222
(final)
$110
(sold out)
Produced September 2010.

Re-punched Mint Mark, original D punched far to the left, then corrected (the same reverse die that was used in Die Pair 4). Over-struck four times at 200 tons. Subdued luster, with surface reflectivity ranging from satiny-matte to somewhat shiny. All were issued with certificates stating “Die Pair 5”, but no mention of the surface finish.
Die Pair 5

quad-struck, early die state

(subdued luster, matte finish)
external image image023.jpgexternal image image024.jpg
Die Pair 5

quad-struck, late die state
(subdued luster, shiny finish)
external image image025.jpgexternal image image026.jpg


Die Pair 4
6
(final)
N/A
Produced early-2010.
Obverse die failed to harden properly and mushroomed (expanded & distorted). Reverse die shows re-punched Mint Mark, original D punched far to the left, then corrected (this same reverse die was used later with Die Pair 5). Four of the six were multi-struck with major coin shift between strikes, and those four were all given a post-strike simulated circulated finish.
Die Pair 4

distorted obverse, multi-struck
external image image027.jpg
Die Pairs 4 & 5

re-punched D/D west-east
external image image028.jpg


Die Pair 3
0
(final)
N/A
Unsatisfactory die detail due to corrosion during heat-treating.

No strikes were made from this die pair.


Die Pair 2
31
(final)
N/A
Produced mid-2009.

No re-punching on mint mark. Very high rims. Shiny rippled surfaces. Repeating pattern of shallow die gouges between “B” and “E” of Liberty. An additional 90 pieces were produced, but later melted.
Die Pair 2
external image image029.jpg
Die Pair 2

mint mark
external image image030.jpg
Die Pair 2

die gouges
external image image031.jpg
Die Pair 2

high rims – edge appears thick
external image image032.jpg


Die Pair 1
4
(final)
N/A
First production, early 2009.

Re-punched Mint Mark, original D punched North, then corrected.

Some show evidence of die clashing on reverse. All show evidence of multiple striking. All 4 over-struck on Peace Dollars were given a post-strike simulated circulated finish.
In addition, the following quantities were over-struck on other coins:
1976 Bicentennial Half Dollar: 1

1965 Kennedy Half Dollars: 30

1965 Washington Quarter: 1

1965 Roosevelt Dime: 1

1965 Jefferson Nickel: 1

1965 Lincoln Cent: 1
Under-size brass blanks (test strikes): 2
A total of five 39mm pure copper pieces were also struck using Die 1 obverse and the Denver Mint centennial shield reverse.
Die Pair 1

clashed reverse
external image image033.jpgexternal image image034.jpg
Die Pair 1

re-punched D/D north-south

(the visible ”S” mint mark

is a remnant of host coin)
external image image035.jpg
Die Pair 1

over-struck 1965 mint set
external image image036.jpg

external image image037.jpg

external image image038.jpg

external image image039.jpg

external image image040.jpg
Die 1 obverse

Denver Mint centennial reverse
struck in larger 39mm collar
pure copper
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